Photography 101: How to photograph really small creatures.

I love the Macro feature on my camera!  Here’s two pics of an aphid-like critter (it may actually BE an aphid for all I know):

The best thing I’ve seen is that if you have a solid background with a minimum amount of detail to have your Macro subject on, it’s far easier to take advantage of a good photo opportunity.

These photos were taken with my FujiFilm FinePix S camera which I tout and recommend.  Of course, I also have used Canon and Nikon but this one was the cheapest for what I wanted, which was a good mid-range camera with panoramic capabilities, Macro, and a great flash.

Different cameras work differently – not all of them are the best for Macro shots – glass lenses can be more precise, but still – check out and TRY each prospective camera before you buy it, or check out the reviews online.

I have found that the software works best for Macro if you have the subject fill as much of the focus area as possible with that solid background being the opposite as the subject – light subject, dark background and dark subjects need light backgrounds with a slight pattern or texture to it.

Your camera’s Shoot button is likely a two-stage one with the first stage being the trigger for the software to focus on the subject.  Sometimes you will have to completely zoom out, and then slowly focus on things increasingly closer to the subject for the software to work correctly.  The software does not work very well when you are trying to focus on the distant tag on a car with a Stop sign post in the foreground.  For these situations, a manually-focused lens is what you need.

The EEE Asus TF101 has a fantastic onboard camera that is just outstanding at Macro shots. And business cards.  Oh, yeah, and Macro is also great for capturing small pieces of evidence like a scrape or small piece of damage such as pry bar marks at a robbery, so please don’t think it’s all roses and bugs in the Macro world.

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About Amy Barnes

Author has extensive experience in Retail, including two years as a supervisor. Educated in Psychology, Financial Accounting, Criminal Justice, and Programming. Work experience in Law Enforcement, Security (IT), Programming (REALBasic, SQL, VB, JAVA), Retail.
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